Remembrance – 9/11

Lest we forget as some are wont to do…

First in New York:

Then:

And:

Then in DC:

And then in Shanksville, PA, a group of brave people bring down a fourth plane before it kills anyone other than themselves.

While people still struggle to get out of the South Tower, this happens:

And then the North Tower:

And again:

Bush and Cheney did not arrange this.  Crazy people did.  We are not at war for oil.  Look again.

THIS is why we are at war:

For more, go here.

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2 Responses to Remembrance – 9/11

  1. poohzcrew says:

    You used the word ‘wont’ in a sentence… sigh.

    I was on my way to LaGuardia Airport that morning. I was supposed to be meeting up with my husband, who had just finished 11 weeks of OBC in TX and reported to Fort Benning. While I watched the first tower collapse from the Whitestone Bridge, he was driving around post in a daze, listening to it all on the radio, trying to figure out how to find out if I was okay, or if my plane was one of the ones involved. It was hours before the phone lines cleared enough that I could get through to his clinic and leave a message for him. It was another week before I was able to get an Amtrak train out of the city and join him in Georgia. The first time we drove from Columbus to Atlanta to visit his sister, I hyperventilated with panic when we neared the Atlanta airport and I could see all the planes in the sky. Needless to say, I’ll never forget.

  2. vivianlouise says:

    Awww, you noticed! Some are wont not to notice. *blushes*

    I was waiting for news of my nephew’s birth, Astroboy. Mom called crying to tell me to turn on the news. I knew right away that we were at war. I heard the news that the South Tower collapsed while driving to work. To this day I can’t tell you how I didn’t hit someone. Then watched the North Tower fall at work. I worried about the people I knew in the WTC and the Pentagon. Everyone I knew was safe. My uncle had worked for the Port Authority for 30 years. He lost 70 + people that day.

    I don’t want to forget those days. I don’t want to ever forget why we fight.

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